Attorney General candidates focus on Redbook reform, student groups

N-Attorney-General-Debate Colby Patterson
Attorney General candidates Maclane Taggart and Zack Strong particiate in the Attorney General debate hosted by current Attorney General Molly Wheeler yesterday in the Union. Photo by Brent Uberty.

Attorney General candidates Maclane Taggart and Zack Strong particiate in the Attorney
General debate hosted by current Attorney General Molly Wheeler yesterday in the Union. Photo by Brent Uberty.

The ASUU Attorney General debate was held in the Union on Monday. The two candidates, Maclane Taggart and Zack Strong, answered questions asked by moderator Molly Wheeler, the current ASUU Attorney General.

Taggart said if he were elected he would like to reform Redbook, the student constitution, to make the election process and rules standardized to avoid chaos.

Strong said he agreed with Taggart on Redbook reform but that there is a deeper issue within ASUU and he hopes to shift the focus back to students and student groups on campus.

“I don’t like how ASUU has been run the last three years,” Strong said. “[The] biggest challenge is holding ASUU accountable.”

Wheeler asked each candidate what set them apart from their opponent. Taggart said his “strong moral compass” distinguishes him from Strong. He also said he better understands the Attorney General position.

Strong said he does not like that the same groups of students run for ASUU office each year. He said it makes ASUU less inclusive and transparent. Strong said as a first generation U student, he understands the need for students to get involved on campus.

Both Taggart and Strong said if they were elected they would try to lift unnecessary restrictions from student groups.

“I love the university more than I can say,” Taggart said at the debate. “I do feel like students have a place on campus whether they know it or not.”

n.turner@chronicle.utah.edu